Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

IMG_7717

It has been a long time since I’ve been on here.  Too much going on in life.  Nothing more I can say.  I have things to blog and then I haven’t.  Now the holidays are coming and…where has the time gone?

Speaking of holiday’s.  This would be the perfect Christmas (for those that celebrate it) breakfast.  We had it for dinner tonight!  We love to have these types of foods for dinner.

The kids enjoyed it as well.

IMG_7715Khali just dips her fingers in the syrup and leaves the pancake on the plate (she later did eat it though!!).

IMG_7714Caleb really doesn’t like to have his picture taken so he’s acting like he can’t see me taking this.  But he’s eating here too!!!!

IMG_7716Brooklyn ate her pancakes and came back for seconds, but she’s more concerned about having her picture taken.

The reason for these pancakes?

Well, I’ve been trying to remove as much processed foods from our diet as possible.  It’s not an easy task by any means, but I’m working on it.
I found a great website that has a ton of recipes – which is where this came from.  I shopped for the week and I’ll have to say that I didn’t spend any more money than I would have for foods that aren’t as good for you.

I haven’t been as good lately with making the healthiest dinners lately.  As I’ve said, life has been pretty busy.  But it’s time to pay attention to the food we’re putting in our bodies.  Moderation is the key, yes.  But we’re trying!!!

This week I made home made refried beans as well.  I ate those twice for lunch.  GREAT.

Check out the website and let me know what you think.

I did add some cinnamon to this recipe to add a bit more flavor.  To me, I could really taste the flour too much.  After adding a bit, it was fabulous.

We’ll have these again.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes
Recipe Type: Breakfast
Cuisine: Pancakes
Author: Patricia
Ingredients
  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour (I use King Arthur’s organic white whole-wheat flour)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 ¾ cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted + butter for frying
  • 2 ripe bananas, mashed
  • 100% pure maple syrup for serving – I didn’t have 100% pure maple syrup so I tried to use a little of what we had.
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  2. Make a well (hole) in the center of the flour mixture and pour in the honey, eggs, milk, and 2 tablespoons of melted butter. Whisk together thoroughly, but do not overmix.
  3. Gently fold the mashed bananas into the batter with a spatula.
  4. Heat a griddle or sauté pan over medium-high heat. Swirl enough butter around the pan until it is well coated. Add pancake batter using a soup ladle.
  5. When the pancakes have begun brown on the bottom, flip them over to cook the other side.
  6. Serve with warm maple syrup and a side of fruit. And don’t forget to freeze the leftovers for another day!

Have a great rest of the week.  Try this for breakfast this weekend!!

Patricia – Two Girls Cooking

100 Days of Real Food

Is Sugar Addicting?

I recently posted 20 low sugar snacks that I got from iVillage.

I got another email this week with an article about sugar and if it’s addicting.  I know there are others out there that have the same concerns as I do.  These posts aren’t something that I’ve cooked, but they are ideas that give me and hopefully you things to think about when finding recipes or just shopping for food.

I’ve copied all pictures and statements from iVillage’s website.  None of these are my ideas.  May give me ideas on what to make next or not ; )

limit your daily intake of added sugars

 

There’s naturally occurring sugar — fructose in fruit and lactose in milk — and there are added sugars that areput into food and drinks during processing. According to the American Heart Association, women should have no more than 6 teaspoons per day of added sugar, which is 24 grams. Most of us get more than 22 teaspoons per day. “It’s not that sugar has to be avoided completely,” says Marisa Moore, a registered dietician based in Atlanta and a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “You just need to be mindful that it’s added to many foods and beverages, and excess sugar can lead to weight gain.”

 

 

learn to spot the sugar on an ingredients list

 

Sugar goes by many different names. You may see it listed as brown sugar, turbinado sugar, raw sugar, evaporated cane juice, molasses, honey, corn syrup, fruit juice concentrates, agave nectar or barley malt syrup. You’ll also find sugars that end in “-ose” such as maltose or sucrose. Some foods may have more than one type of sugar listed. “They all impact blood glucose levels the same. The goal is to reduce all added sugar sources,” says Moore.

 

 

 

look beyond the nutrition label

 

In order to understand how much added sugar is in a food, you have to read the nutrition facts panel as well as the ingredients list. “The nutrition facts panel tells you how many total grams of sugar are in the food, but it doesn’t distinguish what’s a natural sugar versus what’s an added sugar,” says Constance Brown-Riggs, a registered dietician based in Massapequa, New York and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In addition, the higher up in the ingredients list, the more of that ingredient is contained in the food. A basic rule to limit the amount of added sugars: Look for foods that list sugars fifth or later in the ingredients.

 

get to know your food

 

Not all sugar is bad. “You have to become familiar with what’s natural sugar and what’s added,” says Moore. For example, fruit or 100 percent fruit juice is all sugar, but it’s naturally occurring. Dairy products such as skim milk list 12 grams of sugar but it’s naturally-occurring lactose. On the other hand, a can of soda may contain up to 35 grams of sugar and no nutrients.


 

 

watch for hidden sugar

 

You know sugar is in cakes, cookies, pies and candy. But added sugar also appears in foods where you might not expect it such as breads, tomato and barbecue sauces, salad dressings, marinades, nut butters, condiments such as ketchup, and canned fruit. It’s hiding in “healthy” foods, too. “Even whole-grain cereals may contain a lot of added sugar,” says Moore. Trail mix may seem healthy, but you’ve got to avoid those that contain candy pieces. Apple sauce may seem like a sensible snack, but you have to choose those that say “unsweetened” or “no added sugar.” Yogurt contains natural sugars, but it may also be loaded down with extra sugar if it’s a flavored variety.

 

be wary of beverages

 

Bottled lemonade, iced tea, iced coffee, protein, energy and some sports drinks typically contain enough added sugar to put you well over the recommended daily intake. “Some beverages may have 40 to 50 grams of sugar per serving,” says Moore. “That means you have to treat them as a dessert and splurge occasionally. They shouldn’t be a part of your daily diet.” If you’re looking for refreshment, get a plain iced tea or iced coffee and add a teaspoon of sugar, which is far less than bottled beverages contain. If you like the carbonation in a soft drink, try flavored sparkling water or plain seltzer with a drizzle of juice.

 

 

compare brands

When it comes to foods in cans, bottles, boxes, and bags, compare labels to find the brands with lower amounts of added sugar, says Brown-Riggs. Buy cereal with the least amount of sugar. Choose canned fruits without added sugar or heavy syrup. Look for low-sugar, no-sugar or all-fruit varieties of jams and jellies. For salad dressing, make a vinaigrette from pungent vinegars such as balsamic and citrus-flavored oils. At your next party, mix your favorite liquor with pureed fresh fruit instead of store-bought mixers. And be careful about fat-free and “light” foods — manufacturers often add sugar to compensate for the loss of flavor from fat.

add your own sweetness

If you crave sweetness, mix it in yourself. “You’ll add far less sugar than the manufacturer,” says Moore. For example, instead of buying prepackaged instant oatmeal, which may contain up to 13 grams of sugar, buy the plain variety. Add your own mix-ins such as dried cranberries or blueberries, mashed bananas, a drizzle of maple syrup or a pinch of brown sugar. If you add aromatic spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger, you may not miss the sugar at all. You can also try alternative non-caloric sweeteners such as stevia or sucralose (Splenda).

monitor portions

Like everything else when it comes to nutrition, stick with a sensible portion, says Brown-Riggs. Use a small glass if you’re drinking juice or absolutely have to have a little soda. If sweets are your weakness, deprivation never works, so have a few bites of a small dessert, share with a friend or opt for natural sugars from frozen grapes or fresh pineapple. You can also reduce the amount of sugar in home-baked goods if you substitute unsweetened applesauce or pureed prunes for part of the sugar (you may have to experiment, but try reducing sugar by about 1/3 for starters).

give your taste buds time to adapt

You’re used to sugar in everything from cereal to pasta sauces, but you can learn to eat less sugar in time. Cut back gradually. For example, says Brown-Riggs, “if you typically use three teaspoons of sugar in your coffee, cut down to two, then one over a month’s time”. If you’re a regular soda drinker, reduce the number by one per week. In a matter of weeks you probably won’t even miss the sugar overload.

are you a sugar addict?

 

Can’t get enough sweet stuff? You could be addicted to sugar, says Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., author of the book Beat Sugar Addiction NOW! But realizing you’re hooked doesn’t mean you have to give sugar up.  Instead, Dr. Teitelbaum says, “You have to figure out what’s causing your sugar cravings, then treat that underlying cause. Not only will your sugar cravings go away, but you’ll feel dramatically better overall.” To find out where you stand, take the following quizzes (adapted from Beat Sugar Addiction NOW!) to see if you’re addicted to sugar and pinpoint your sugar addict type (from Quick-Fix Sugar Fanatic and Sweet Tooth Soother to Sugar Self Medicator and Hormonal Sugar Hunter). Then, learn the life-changing tips you need to feel better fast.

 

 

true or false?

My favorite jeans have gotten too tight over the past year.

true or false?

I’m generally not cranky, but when I am about to get my period I get the blues or feel really anxious.

true or false?

I find it very hard to say no to sweets that are offered to me.

true or false?

My go-to mood booster is usually ice cream, cookies, or something else I know I probably shouldn’t be eating.

true or false?

I try to slim down — but the scale won’t budge.

true or false?

I eat sweets or simple carbs (like bagels or white bread) at least three times a day.

true or false?

If I wait more than a few hours to eat, I get shaky and start to feel woozy.

how did you do? if you tallied up less than two “true” answers:

Congrats! While you like sweets as much as the next person, you munch sugar-filled foods in healthy moderation. Keep eating lots of good-for-you fare like produce and lean meat, limit yourself to one sweet a day and you’ll avoid the sluggishness, irritability and weight woes that can accompany sugar addiction, says Dr. Teitelbaum.

if you scored three or more “true” answers:

Daily cravings, snacking on sweet treats at all hours of the day, eating meals that are made of processed foods loaded with excess sugar: These are all signs that you’re a sugar addict, says Dr. Teitelbaum. But don’t worry, you can kick your sweet tooth so you have more energy, a better disposition and an easier time slimming down! Keep clicking to find out what’s causing your sugar addiction and learn super-simple ways to get your appetite and health back on track.

I’m not sure if I’m a sugar addict or not.  I love my jawbreakers, I love to have candy.  I love to make the sweet treats, but I can leave those out if needed.  My downfall is the candy.  And so when I’m at the store I get mad at them for putting those dang candy bars right in my sight where I have to stay strong so that I don’t put on in my cart.  Some times I do.  Most times I don’t.  We have a saying at work: Stay Strong or Indulge Completely.  I do indulge on some days.  And I believe that we all should.  (Now if you’re specifically told not to eat sugar, then please don’t use that statement as you should do so).  I am not on a major strict diet.  I do watch what I eat so that I can stay healthy and to be a good example for the kids.

There is a little quiz on the iVillage site after this portion to see what type of sugar addict you are.  If you interested in reading the full article, you can find it here:

iVillage

I hope these little posts I’ve been putting up have helped at least someone to think about what you’re putting in your body and to help you think before shopping and buying.

Patricia – Two Girls Cooking

 

Creamy Vanilla-Caramel Cheesecake

Ok so I posted that I was going to see if I could find some low fat/low sugar desserts and foods.

Today I have two recipes that I’m trying out and we’ll see how you and the family like them.

First off we have the Creamy Vanilla-Caramel Cheesecake.  It uses low fat yogurt, low fat crackers, low fat cream cheese and also the caramel sauce is low fat.  Now I had said before that I had seen the low fat food items tends to increase the sugar content.  I did look on each of the items that I bought and for sure the sugar was much higher in the yogurt and the caramel.  But looking at the fat compared to the sugar, I gave in on these two items.  It wasn’t that much to make a difference right!!  I’d rather have a bit more sugar than a lot more and added fat as well.

I wanted to run to Barnes and Noble to see if I could find a diabetic cookbook but decided that I’d check out online on Betty Crocker.  Sure enough, there is a recipe area for diabetic desserts and dinners.  So here we go.

Ingredients

15 reduced-fat chocolate or vanilla wafer cookies, crushed (1/2 cup)

2 packages (8 ounces each) reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchâtel) , softened

2/3 cup sugar

3 egg whites or 1/2 cup fat-free cholesterol-free egg product

2 teaspoons vanilla

2 cups vanilla low-fat yogurt

2 tablespoons Gold Medal® all-purpose flour

1/3 cup fat-free caramel topping

Pecan halves, if desired (I left this out as we’re not big on pecans)

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 300°F. Spray springform pan, 9×3 inches, with cooking spray. Sprinkle cookie crumbs over bottom of pan.
  2. Beat cream cheese in medium bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until smooth. Add sugar, egg whites and vanilla. Beat on medium speed about 2 minutes or until smooth. Add yogurt and flour. Beat on low speed until smooth.
  3. Carefully spread batter over cookie crumbs in pan. Bake 1 hour. Turn off oven; cool in oven 30 minutes with door closed. Remove from oven; cool 15 minutes. Cover and refrigerate at least 3 hours.
  4. Drizzle caramel topping over cheesecake. Garnish with pecan halves. Store covered in the refrigerator.
I decided not to tell anyone that this was a diabetic recipe until AFTER they ate it.  The kids won’t know what it means, but Craig will.  And when you take sweets our of a dessert, then it surely can’t taste as good right!!!!  WRONG.  This was fabulous.  If you’re in need of these types of recipes the check out Betty Crocker online.

I hope this satisfies your sweet tooth and you continue on with me and my search to find not only low fat but low sugar recipes to you.  Me?  I had to have another piece just to make sure that it was in fact low sugar.  This lacked nothing that the real version has.   It is rich in flavor for sure.  Very, very good.

I added some fresh frozen berries to another piece.  That was just as good!

Have a great day.

Patricia – Two Girls Cooking 😉

Makes 16 servings

Nutritional Information

  • 1 Serving (1 Serving)Calories 175 (Calories from Fat 65 ),Total Fat 7 g(Saturated Fat 5 g,Cholesterol 25 mg;Sodium 180 mg;Total Carbohydrate 23 g(Dietary Fiber 0g,Protein 5 g;Percent Daily Value*:Vitamin A 6.00%;Vitamin C 0.00%;Calcium 6.00%;Iron 0.00%;Exchanges:1 Starch;1/2 Milk;1 Fat;*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Source

Betty Crocker

20 Low Sugar Snacks

I subscribed to Every Day Health and get daily emails.  Some are about exercises, oral hygiene habits, healthy eating habits, etc.  When this email came to me I thought I’d share it in case there are others out there that are trying to watch your sugar intake.  Whether you’re diabetic, have cholesterol issues or what not, these sounded pretty good.   I know that I’ll give quite a few of them a try.

I realized that when I was put on a low fat/low cholesterol diet I removed those foods that were high in fat (or tried to do the best I could).  But what I also learned from watching a recent 60 minutes program “Is Sugar Toxic”? I had to make some changes.  When I took the fat out of the food, I was replacing more sugar in my body.  The show states that when food takes the fat out, it’s replaced with sugar to make it taste better.  So for those that are diabetic and also trying to watch your fat intake, this could be helpful.  I’m sure not a doctor by any means, I’m just speaking on what I’ve seen happen to my own body by removing those fatty foods.  My blood glucose numbers got higher!

That means the dang Easter candy is out!  Though I believe that all things are in moderation, I also believe that what I saw on the show to be eye opening.  No I’m not getting anything by promoting 60 Minutes or Every Day Living, I’m just trying to pass on a good word when I see it.  If you don’t have time to watch the video, let me share one important thing that surprised me the most.  These doctors did a study with healthy adults.  They put them in a room, where they were observed 24/7 on their eating habits.  The first month they were given food that was good for them, it was weighed out for size control.  They would monitor their blood levels for any changes.

The next month they gave foods full of sugar, kool aid, fatty foods, etc.  They monitored they blood levels every 30 minutes.  There was a noticeable change in their blood sugar levels within 2 weeks.  Just an eye opening thought.  Again, when I came across this site with the low sugar snacks, I had to post.

Here you go..

Low-Sugar Snacking
The best snacks for type 2 diabetes have no added sugar and combine protein and healthy fats with high–quality carbohydrates — an ideal mix for keeping hunger at bay and blood–sugar levels on an even keel. Choose one or two of the following snacks per day; I’ve also provided the total meal breakdowns for people who use the food-exchange system, and the total calories and grams of carbs for those who opt for carb–counting.

Part-Skim String Cheese
Perfect for on-the-go snacking, one stick of part-skim string cheese is packed with protein and calcium — plus, there’s minimal carbohydrate so this snack hardly impacts your blood sugar.
80 calories, 0 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 medium-fat meat

 

Hard-boiled Egg Whites
Snacking on four hard-boiled egg whites will give you the boost you need to keep going in between meals. Because egg whites are pure, high-quality protein, they have minimal impact on your blood sugar. Plus, boiling eggs takes only a couple minutes, and they can be stored in the fridge, making them a great grab-and-go option during the week.
70 calories, 0 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 2 very lean meat

Turkey or Ham Lettuce Wraps
Want to put a fun “twist” on a low-calorie snack? Wrap two ounces of turkey or lean ham in fresh, crispy lettuce — it’s a tasty combo that will satisfy your hunger and boost your energy levels.
70 calories, 2 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 2 very lean meats

Whole Nuts
Nuts are one of nature’s perfect foods, since they offer a highly nutritious package of fiber, protein, and heart-healthy unsaturated fats, plus antioxidants. Because they’re portable and don’t require refrigeration, you can stash them in your purse or car for an “emergency snack” when you’re on a tight schedule. I recommend one ounce (about a quarter-cup, and don’t go overboard since they’re high in calories) of unsalted almonds, cashews, pecans, walnuts, peanuts, macadamia nuts, or soy nuts.
180 to 200 calories, 4 to 9 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 4 fats

Cottage Cheese with Nuts or Flaxseed
Cottage cheese is packed with energy-boosting lean protein. Sprinkle two tablespoons of ground flaxseed (high in omega-3s and fiber) or one tablespoon of nuts on a half cup of fat-free or 1 percent reduced-fat cottage cheese for a nutritious, filling snack.
130 to 140 calories, 4 to 7 g carbohydrates
Exchanges; 2 lean meats, 1–2 fats

Peanut Butter with Celery Sticks
Here’s one yummy snack that deserves its popularity! Peanut butter delivers appetite-satisfying protein, and it’s a good source of monounsaturated (healthy) fat. Enjoy crunchy, low-calorie celery sticks with one level tablespoon of peanut butter (look for an all-natural brand with no added sugar or oils) for only 100 calories.
100 calories, 4 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 2 fats

Pistachios
I single out pistachios for a couple of reasons: Of all types of nuts, they contain the highest level of phytosterols — natural plant compounds that have been shown to lower cholesterol. They’re also my “nut of choice” when it comes to weight loss: For 100 calories you get about 25 pistachio nuts (per nut, they’re the least caloric of all nuts) and, because you have to remove the shells, they’ll slow down your eating!
100 calories, 5 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 2 fats

Edamame
Edamame (green soybeans) contain fiber-rich, high quality carbohydrate, protein, and heart-healthyomega-3 fats, a winning trio that helps keep blood-sugar levels steady. Buy them in the pod (like pistachios, the shells will slow down your eating) and steam or microwave a cup’s worth, snap them open, and pop ’em in your mouth — yum!
150 calories, 12 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 medium-fat meat, 1 starch

Veggies with Guacamole or Hummus
Guacamole (a heart-healthy pick, thanks to themonounsaturated fats in avocado) and hummus (made from nutrient-rich, high-fiber chickpeas) both make great snacking dips. Try a quarter cup of either with sliced vegetables for your next mid-afternoon pick-me-up.
120 to 150 calories, 13 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 2 vegetables, 1 to 2 fats

Sunflower Seeds
Sunflower seeds may be tiny, but they’re big on nutrition. Like nuts, they’re high in healthy fats and protein and low in carbs — the ideal nutrient ratio for a diabetes-friendly snack. As an added bonus, the seeds are rich in magnesium, a mineral that may aid in blood sugar control. A half cup of shell-on sunflower seeds is a good snack-sized portion (and removing the shells will slow down your munching). Ideally, choose unsalted seeds to keep sodium levels down.
120 calories, 4 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 3 fats

Celery Sticks and Cream Cheese
Though it’s not as high in protein as cottage cheese or peanut butter, cream cheese is a soft, spreadable cheese that can be a satisfying addition to a snack of celery sticks (or another crisp veggie). Regular cream cheese is very high in fat, so make sure to choose a reduced-fat brand and limit your portion to two tablespoons.
80 calories, 2 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1.5 fat

Sugar-Free Gelatin
Yearning for something sweet and fruity? Sugar-free gelatin will satisfy your craving for almost no calories. And, if you’re following the exchange system, it’s considered a “free food” (meaning you can eat it whenever you like)!
10 calories, 0 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: free food

(I had no clue on this one.  I will be making more sugar free jello).

Veggies with Cottage Cheese
Looking for another way to enjoy protein-packed cottage cheese? Use it as a dipping sauce for your favorite crudités. Slice up cucumbers, baby carrots, or pepper strips and pair with a half cup of nonfat or low-fat cottage cheese. You’ll feel full — without any guilt — in no time!
110 calories, 10 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 2 lean meats; 1 ½ vegetables

Apple and Peanut Butter
Another high-scoring snack that can be quickly assembled by slicing a small apple and topping it with a level tablespoon of natural peanut butter. High in protein, high in fiber, and plenty of taste in every bite.
166 calories, 22 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 fruit, 2 fats

Rice Cake with Cheese
Top a low-cal rice cake with a slice of reduced-fat or fat-free cheese. The cheese adds protein to keep you satisfied, and the entire snack is still pretty low in carbohydrates, making this a great choice for dieters with diabetes.
85 calories, 7 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 lean meat, ½ starch

Yogurt with Flaxseed or Nuts
Yogurt is an excellent source of lean protein, which plays an important role in weight loss and managing blood sugar for type 2 diabetes. Top a six-ounce container of calcium-rich nonfat plain or artificially sweetened yogurt with two tablespoons of ground flaxseed and you’ll add a heart-healthy boost of omega-3s. For added variety, swap the flaxseed for 1 tablespoon chopped almonds, pecans, or walnuts. Note that I recommend artificially sweetened yogurt for diabetics rather than regular sweetened yogurt to keep carb intake to a minimum.
150 calories, 20 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 to 2 fats, 1 fat-free milk

Oranges and Almonds
For an energy-boosting bite, this snack gets an A plus. Oranges have a high water content and more soluble fiber than most fruits, and almonds (ten make a great snack-sized portion) deliver a nutritious package of fiber, protein, and heart-healthy unsaturated fats.
150 calories, 21 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 fruit, 2 fats

Soy Crisps
If you’re looking for an alternative to traditional high-fat snacks like potato chips, baked soy crisps are it. They’re full of satisfying crunch and low in calories and fat, but they still pack a nutritional punch because they contain soy protein and fiber. Check labels before you buy; some brands offer calcium-fortified or gluten-free flavors.
100 calories, 14 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: 1 lean meat, 1 starch

Sugar-free Ice Pops
Cool and refreshing, sugar-free ice pops are a delightful summer treat — but I actually recommend them to diabetics year-round as a low-calorie way to satisfy your after-dinner sweet cravings. Nutrition facts vary from brand to brand, but they’re all super low in calories and contain artificial sweeteners, and therefore have minimal impact on your blood sugar.
15 calories, 4 g carbohydrates
Exchanges: free food

You can go to www.joybauer.com and read about Food Cures for more information.  Joy has a cookbook that I may be ordering as well to help me on my way.

I’ve been doing a lot of baking lately and was asked yesterday by Craig, when we talked about sugars, how I felt about the kids eating these things as well.  And I do agree.  All things in moderation.  Will I take sugar completely from our house?  Most likely the answer is no.  But I will be more aware of what I’m using and making and giving the family.  If it’s not in the house, it can’t be eaten.  If it can’t be eaten as often, then maybe it can be forgotten.

All photos and words about the snacks came from Joy Bauer.

Will you be making wiser choices for your snacks?

Patricia – Two Girls Cooking